From: Bill Graham on

"tony cooper" <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:2vg6g51ukbe7hccongm87dugm6734knoaj(a)4ax.com...
> On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 18:33:21 -0500, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke.usenet(a)cox.net> wrote:
>
>>tony cooper wrote:
>>> On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 12:01:52 -0800, J�rgen Exner
>>> <jurgenex(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> tony cooper <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote:
>>>>>> Same happened to me yesterday in the supermarket. Two products,
>>>>>> for one the price given in $/pound, for the other in $/ounce. How
>>>>>> do you compare them on the spot? No, I cannot do a multiplication
>>>>>> by 16 in my mind on the spot in front of the shelf, I do need
>>>>>> paper and pencil.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Using the metric system it would have been trivial, even if they
>>>>>> had used different sizes, e.g. $/kg and $/100g. Just shift the
>>>>>> comma and you are done.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Not so with the US units. There a pocket calculator seems to be
>>>>>> mandatory for grocery shopping.
>>>>>>
>>>>> You think?
>>>>
>>>> No, I don't think, I know. It happened yesterday while I was looking
>>>> for fresh steaks in the meat aisle in a Safeway store.
>>>
>>> This doesn't ring of truth. Fresh meat is priced per pound. All the
>>> steaks would be priced per pound. Packages have different prices
>>> because they contain different amounts of weight. I can't imagine
>>> you'd need a calculator to compare prices.
>>
>>I've never seen fresh meat packaged other than with the price of the
>>package
>>and the price per pound on it.
>
>
> Yes, that's what I said. If hamburger is priced at X per pound, you
> can compare that with ground chuck at Y per pound.
>
>>
>>>>> Every supermarket in this area has a shelf tag that gives
>>>>> the price per common unit on comparable items. In other words, in
>>>>> the cereal aisle, the tags will all show the price per ounce for the
>>>>> cereal even if the box is labeled by units other than just ounces.
>>>>
>>>> And yes, I am talking about the price on the label on the shelf
>>>> (which happened to match the pricing unit on the individual article,
>>>> too).
>>>
>>> Perhaps where you are it's different, or perhaps you didn't look at
>>> the label carefully. Canned or boxed goods, in this area, can all be
>>> compared by ounce price regardless of the weight in the can or box.
>>>
>>> Here's an example:
>>>
>>> http://www.ses.wsu.edu/Grants/StoreShelf.htm It shows that Jiffy
>>> Peanut Butter is 13.24 cents per ounce. That allows you to compare
>>> other brands, and other sizes of the same brand, by cost-per-ounce.
>>> No calculator needed.
>>>
>>> I've used this tag feature and found that the "economy" size is not
>>> always the most economical size to purchase.
>>
>>Dunno about where you are but around here sometimes one tag is in cost per
>>ounce and another is in cost per pound, on items of the same kind with
>>different brands or different package sizes.
>
> I recognize that practices may be different in different areas, and
> that one supermarket chain may have a different practice from another,
> but Publix, Winn Dixie, and Albertson's all do it the same here. The
> shelf tag will show the price of the box/can *and* the price per
> common unit. Usually the common unit is an ounce.
>
Not to disagree, but I am annoyed about the different Ounces.....If you are
calculating the price of Gold, you have to use some other ounce than the
standard one used in grocery stores.....Exactly why they do this is not at
all clear to me, and it is very annoying......

From: tony cooper on
On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 19:54:33 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net>
wrote:

>Not to disagree, but I am annoyed about the different Ounces.....If you are
>calculating the price of Gold, you have to use some other ounce than the
>standard one used in grocery stores.....Exactly why they do this is not at
>all clear to me, and it is very annoying......

Precious metals and gems are measured in troy ounces. I don't know
why it confuses you unless you are trying to weigh gold on a kitchen
scale. You don't calculate the price of gold. No calculation is
required since the price per troy ounce is given.

The only thing that's a bit confusing is that Krugerrands, and some
other one troy ounce of gold coins, actually weigh 1.0909 troy ounces.
The difference is the amount of copper added for hardness.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
From: Bill Graham on

"tony cooper" <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:8dt6g599nmtt0kjso67q80b9f9s6564dds(a)4ax.com...
> On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 19:54:33 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
>>Not to disagree, but I am annoyed about the different Ounces.....If you
>>are
>>calculating the price of Gold, you have to use some other ounce than the
>>standard one used in grocery stores.....Exactly why they do this is not at
>>all clear to me, and it is very annoying......
>
> Precious metals and gems are measured in troy ounces. I don't know
> why it confuses you unless you are trying to weigh gold on a kitchen
> scale. You don't calculate the price of gold. No calculation is
> required since the price per troy ounce is given.
>
> The only thing that's a bit confusing is that Krugerrands, and some
> other one troy ounce of gold coins, actually weigh 1.0909 troy ounces.
> The difference is the amount of copper added for hardness.
>
> --
> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

The operative phrase in the above is, "Precious metals and gems are measured
in troy ounces." This is what I do not understand, and what is annoying to
me. Why the hell would they separate out precious metals and gems from a
perfectly good measuring system and give them some special, different
measuring system that uses a unit that has the same spelling and
pronunciation as their other measuring system? This is both confusing and
totally unnecessary. It is the kind of thing that makes me prefer my cats to
people......

From: Savageduck on
On 2009-11-17 20:41:24 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> said:

>
> "tony cooper" <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:8dt6g599nmtt0kjso67q80b9f9s6564dds(a)4ax.com...
>> On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 19:54:33 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Not to disagree, but I am annoyed about the different Ounces.....If you are
>>> calculating the price of Gold, you have to use some other ounce than the
>>> standard one used in grocery stores.....Exactly why they do this is not at
>>> all clear to me, and it is very annoying......
>>
>> Precious metals and gems are measured in troy ounces. I don't know
>> why it confuses you unless you are trying to weigh gold on a kitchen
>> scale. You don't calculate the price of gold. No calculation is
>> required since the price per troy ounce is given.
>>
>> The only thing that's a bit confusing is that Krugerrands, and some
>> other one troy ounce of gold coins, actually weigh 1.0909 troy ounces.
>> The difference is the amount of copper added for hardness.
>>
>> --
>> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
>
> The operative phrase in the above is, "Precious metals and gems are
> measured in troy ounces." This is what I do not understand, and what is
> annoying to me. Why the hell would they separate out precious metals
> and gems from a perfectly good measuring system and give them some
> special, different measuring system that uses a unit that has the same
> spelling and pronunciation as their other measuring system? This is
> both confusing and totally unnecessary. It is the kind of thing that
> makes me prefer my cats to people......

You will notice they stuck with tradition and troy ounces instead of
going metric, so at least you don't have to think in grams of gold. As
far as diamonds are concerned we still have to deal with carats, 1
carat = 200 mg, or 3.086 grains which is useful for somebody with
reloading experience.


--
Regards,

Savageduck

From: tony cooper on
On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 20:41:24 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net>
wrote:

>
>"tony cooper" <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote in message
>news:8dt6g599nmtt0kjso67q80b9f9s6564dds(a)4ax.com...
>> On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 19:54:33 -0800, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>Not to disagree, but I am annoyed about the different Ounces.....If you
>>>are
>>>calculating the price of Gold, you have to use some other ounce than the
>>>standard one used in grocery stores.....Exactly why they do this is not at
>>>all clear to me, and it is very annoying......
>>
>> Precious metals and gems are measured in troy ounces. I don't know
>> why it confuses you unless you are trying to weigh gold on a kitchen
>> scale. You don't calculate the price of gold. No calculation is
>> required since the price per troy ounce is given.
>>
>> The only thing that's a bit confusing is that Krugerrands, and some
>> other one troy ounce of gold coins, actually weigh 1.0909 troy ounces.
>> The difference is the amount of copper added for hardness.
>>
>> --
>> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
>
>The operative phrase in the above is, "Precious metals and gems are measured
>in troy ounces." This is what I do not understand, and what is annoying to
>me. Why the hell would they separate out precious metals and gems from a
>perfectly good measuring system and give them some special, different
>measuring system that uses a unit that has the same spelling and
>pronunciation as their other measuring system? This is both confusing and
>totally unnecessary. It is the kind of thing that makes me prefer my cats to
>people......

Hell, Bill, *I* prefer your cats to you.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida