From: Neil Harrington on

"R. Mark Clayton" <nospamclayton(a)btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:s72dnR0m5on4k2bXnZ2dnUVZ8sGdnZ2d(a)bt.com...
>
> "Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote in message
> news:W8-dnQ16jqYTl2fXnZ2dnUVZ_vSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>
>> "R. Mark Clayton" <nospamclayton(a)btinternet.com> wrote in message
>> news:OLmdnQWi2eLSIGTXnZ2dnUVZ7rudnZ2d(a)bt.com...
>>>
> SNIP
>>>


>>>
>>> Even though the Yanks left the Empire they still won't join the rest of
>>> the world.
>>
>> And go metric, you mean? There'd be no point to it. Metric is silly for
>> most ordinary purposes, and it would cost billions to change everything.
>
> Well what about the cost of not changing it?
>
> Item 1 Mars Climate Orbiter crashes and burns*
> $327,600,000.00c
>
> So that's about one dollar per citizen - bad start!

What has that to do with English vs. metric?

>
> (OK so in the fifties the Brits made a car engine that had metric bolts
> with imperial heads... )

The Brits are funny about these things, but there's no reason the two
systems can't co-exist, as in fact they did in Britain for many years. And
still do in the U.S.

>
>> Hexadecimal really makes far more sense than metric, and that is closer
>> to the old familiar English systems of measure. You blokes should have
>> stayed with what you had. (Well, except for currency I suppose. But even
>> that had the advantage of being charmingly quaint.)
>>
>
> Well this only works for avoirdupois weight (16 ounces to the pound), but

That, and many units of liquid measure.

> for troy weight there are only 12

Other than jewelers, who cares about Troy weight?

> and for fluid measure 20 fluid ounces to the pint (OK so it is 16 now in
> our former colony, but what do they know about measurement or spelling?).

Certainly as much as the Brits know about it, and they don't even drive on
the right (i.e., correct) side of the road.

>
> As for the pound sterling this is the last currency in the world that has
> any relation to the original pound weight of silver that the Libra (�) in
> Lsd stood for in Roman times. By 1914 there were four ounces (~112g) of
> 92.5% silver to the �, but now one pound will only buy you about 4 to 5g.
> Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling are working hard to reduce this as
> rapidly as possible :-((.

Cheer up, we have Obama working just as hard to the same end over here. We
started debasing our own currency long before Obama of course, but he's
doing what he can to accelerate the process.


From: (PeteCresswell) on
Per Neil Harrington:
>> Was Pinto the one where the occupants were incinerated if
>> somebody hit it from behind?
>
>That's the one. Probably something of an exaggerated problem, but never
>having been hit in it from behind I can't speak from experience. Of course
>those who *were* incinerated in Pintos wouldn't have considered it an
>exaggeration.

IIRC, the bigwigs at Ford decided not to put in a protective
plate that would have prevented it because it would cost
something like $1.83 more per car than the anticipated legal
judgments by the incinerated.

Nice folks...
--
PeteCresswell
From: Neil Harrington on

"(PeteCresswell)" <x(a)y.Invalid> wrote in message
news:47emf5pj8g53hhkochk87u5l5aqmu07h8q(a)4ax.com...
> Per Neil Harrington:
>>> Was Pinto the one where the occupants were incinerated if
>>> somebody hit it from behind?
>>
>>That's the one. Probably something of an exaggerated problem, but never
>>having been hit in it from behind I can't speak from experience. Of course
>>those who *were* incinerated in Pintos wouldn't have considered it an
>>exaggeration.
>
> IIRC, the bigwigs at Ford decided not to put in a protective
> plate that would have prevented it because it would cost
> something like $1.83 more per car than the anticipated legal
> judgments by the incinerated.
>
> Nice folks...

I remember reading something like that. That may be a little simplistic,
though. I don't know.


From: tony cooper on
On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 18:01:49 -0500, "Neil Harrington"
<secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:

>
>"(PeteCresswell)" <x(a)y.Invalid> wrote in message
>news:47emf5pj8g53hhkochk87u5l5aqmu07h8q(a)4ax.com...
>> Per Neil Harrington:
>>>> Was Pinto the one where the occupants were incinerated if
>>>> somebody hit it from behind?
>>>
>>>That's the one. Probably something of an exaggerated problem, but never
>>>having been hit in it from behind I can't speak from experience. Of course
>>>those who *were* incinerated in Pintos wouldn't have considered it an
>>>exaggeration.
>>
>> IIRC, the bigwigs at Ford decided not to put in a protective
>> plate that would have prevented it because it would cost
>> something like $1.83 more per car than the anticipated legal
>> judgments by the incinerated.
>>
>> Nice folks...
>
>I remember reading something like that. That may be a little simplistic,
>though. I don't know.
>
There are comments on various websites that say that Ford was
unwilling to spend the money for a design change to prevent the
problem. It smacks of urban myth to me.

For Ford to be able to pin-point the cost of the added plate, they
would have had to be able to predict the problem in the initial design
stage. That doesn't sound reasonable even for greedy corporate types.

If Ford declined to retro-fit extant models, or re-fit by recall, the
cost would have been a great deal more per unit than $1.83.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
From: J�rgen Exner on
"Neil Harrington" <secret(a)illumnati.net> wrote:
>Easier: 5 x 5280 / 12. Why go through all that other bullshit?

Because 5280 is such a nice number in the hexadezimal system that
everyone will know it. NOT.

>> According to your statement above this is actually the only way because
>> according to you you would never need to know how many feet there are in
>> a mile. Besides, how on earth can possibly remember those odd numbers
>> anyway?
>
>I don't think I know anyone who doesn't know there are 5280 feet in a mile,

Well, you do now.

>unless you're talking about nautical miles. Speaking of which, don't you use
>knots as a measure of airspeed? They aren't metric.

You seem to be somewhat confused. Nautical miles and thus knots are part
of the ISO system (aka 'metric') although obviously they are not decimal
based.

>Neither is time. If you really think metric is so great, why not do
>something about those pesky 60-second minutes, 60-minute hours and 24-hour
>days? Wouldn't you rather have *everything* go by orders of ten? Wow, what a
>wonderful metricized world that would be!

Again you are confused. The common time is part of ISO (aka 'metric')
although obviously not decimal (or hexadecimal for that matter).

>> And can you tell me how many drops there are in a quart?
>
>Why would anyone care?

Mabye because they want to know how long their bottle of eyedrops (size
10 tablespoons just to pick a number) will last?

>The point is, drops are still used as a unit of
>liquid measure and they are not metric.

Well, and when I order a cup of coffee in a restaurant I do not expect
to be served exactly 1/4 quart of coffee. So cup is still used as unit
of liquid measure although the amount measured is not imperial, either.

jue