From: Peter on
"Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
news:NaOdneCVXOQKr2vWnZ2dnUVZ_gGdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>
> "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
> news:2010052023445033169-savageduck1(a)REMOVESPAMmecom...
>> On 2010-05-20 22:55:11 -0700, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> said:
>>
>>
>>
>>>>
>>> I went to school on Long Island.......High school in Bayside in 1950 to
>>> 1852. We had a geometry teacher who was a drunk.
>>
>> 1950-1852? Apparently not the only one who was drunk!
>>
>> --
>> Regards,
>>
>> Savageduck
>>
>
> Somebody needs to invent a spellchecker that works with numbers......


My dictionary shows that The R�gence is the period in French history between
1715 and 1723, when King Louis XV was a minor and the land was governed by a
Regent.
The exam NY is called "Regents" My spell checker shows no such word as
"regence."

--
Peter

From: Bill Graham on

"Mark L" <markl071616(a)yaspamhoo.com> wrote in message
news:fgkcv55hribemet54scm6nq675sq961mlk(a)4ax.com...
> On Thu, 20 May 2010 22:40:00 -0700, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Mark L" <markl071616(a)yaspamhoo.com> wrote in message
>>news:a397v5htn5bbil2smq6n11c1t7nm76d14l(a)4ax.com...
>>> On Wed, 19 May 2010 01:04:56 -0700, "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>"Mark L" <markl071616(a)yaspamhoo.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:pij6v5po2q8hivrh0sk4ravi91lptesvnf(a)4ax.com...
>>>>> On Tue, 18 May 2010 20:15:17 -0400, "Peter"
>>>>> <peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>"Mark L" <markl071616(a)yaspamhoo.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>news:6596v5ln8fnmjathc1a9i0d75d0a19m8c5(a)4ax.com...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> You will find an excellent micro-example of this playing out in the
>>>>>>> popular
>>>>>>> TV show called "Survivor". If there was no monetary reward you would
>>>>>>> see
>>>>>>> a
>>>>>>> very very different game being played. The most intelligent, wise,
>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>> strongest would be the most valued members. I've lived in just such
>>>>>>> a
>>>>>>> community for three years during the 70's. Living off the land on a
>>>>>>> remote
>>>>>>> South Pacific island with approximately 50 to 100 others. Money had
>>>>>>> absolutely no value to any of us there. I could play the TV
>>>>>>> game-show
>>>>>>> of
>>>>>>> "Survivor" for a year while standing on my head, it would be an
>>>>>>> enjoyable
>>>>>>> way to live, but I would not win their game. Instead (in the
>>>>>>> capitalists'
>>>>>>> game of "Survivor") the most intelligent, wise, and strongest are
>>>>>>> very
>>>>>>> often voted off first because they are a threat to the less
>>>>>>> intelligent,
>>>>>>> less wise, but greedy. Eventually only the most self-serving,
>>>>>>> manipulative,
>>>>>>> and deceitful ones are left. (Does this remind you of any faction of
>>>>>>> your
>>>>>>> own present society? Most call it "the government".) In a capitalist
>>>>>>> promoting society you are getting a clear and frightening glimpse of
>>>>>>> the
>>>>>>> evolutionary future of humanity being played out. "As is the fractal
>>>>>>> part,
>>>>>>> so goes the fractal whole."
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Was that the place they used bananas as currency?
>>>>>>I can just hear the parents yelling at their kids. "YOU MUST THINK
>>>>>>MONEY
>>>>>>GROWS ON TREES."
>>>>>
>>>>> No. Your personality and what you could do for others was your only
>>>>> "currency". Those without either could not "afford" to live there and
>>>>> left
>>>>> on their own. That kind of currency does not grow on trees, nor can
>>>>> someone
>>>>> else just give it to you, or leave it to you in their Will. Bananas,
>>>>> like
>>>>> everything else, was shared for free. We used one large cave for what
>>>>> we
>>>>> called "The Library". If you happened to be foraging and gathered too
>>>>> much
>>>>> of something or received some item from a pass-through tourist and
>>>>> didn't
>>>>> need it, it would be put into "The Library". Where anyone who needed
>>>>> anything could go and get it without even having to sign it out. No
>>>>> need
>>>>> to
>>>>> return it either, unless you wanted to. "The Library" was always
>>>>> packed
>>>>> full. It contained a few books, many utensils, emergency medical
>>>>> supplies,
>>>>> fishing/diving gear, maps, clothing (but nobody wore clothing there so
>>>>> that
>>>>> was mostly used to make more functional items), etc. Since we liked
>>>>> fresh
>>>>> foods there was a rather large stockpile of unused canned-goods and
>>>>> other
>>>>> dry-goods in "The Library" too. We had more enjoyable meals by
>>>>> spearing
>>>>> our
>>>>> food on the reefs or hunting inland. Lobster, wrasse, abalone, $90 per
>>>>> qt.
>>>>> limpet-like shellfish delicacies that are sold in specialty shops
>>>>> today
>>>>> (I
>>>>> would regularly lunch on those, they were 4x's the size you can find
>>>>> in
>>>>> any
>>>>> store), mountain-goat, etc. Going up into the highlands of the valley
>>>>> to
>>>>> find all manner of fruits, nuts, and vegetables that you pay an arm
>>>>> and
>>>>> a
>>>>> leg for in any store today. Even coffee-beans were readily available.
>>>>> I
>>>>> used to roast them in a pan over a campfire. All for free. Nobody had
>>>>> any
>>>>> set "jobs" and there were no "rulers" nor "leaders". People just did
>>>>> what
>>>>> they enjoyed doing and doing for each other. Somehow everything always
>>>>> got
>>>>> done. Any conflicts were usually solved by talking during dinner.
>>>>> After
>>>>> dinners those who had no hunting nor foraging skills might offer their
>>>>> services as masseuses to those who worked hard all day. Others
>>>>> provided
>>>>> entertainment. Some acted as valuable teachers for those that wanted
>>>>> to
>>>>> learn. Some tried their hand at all of these things.
>>>>>
>>>>> Many who came through couldn't afford to live there for free. There
>>>>> was
>>>>> nothing in their personality that they could or would do for others.
>>>>> They
>>>>> would just leave without even being told to. Total failures. Perfect
>>>>> reflections of present society.
>>>>>
>>>>> Before you even bother asking the most often asked question of me,
>>>>> "Why
>>>>> did
>>>>> _you_ leave this paradise?" I'll answer with the only answer that came
>>>>> to
>>>>> me one night while laying on the grass-covered helicopter landing and
>>>>> staring up into the star-filled sky: "A student's lessons are for
>>>>> naught
>>>>> if
>>>>> they remain sitting at their desk." After receiving that lesson there
>>>>> was
>>>>> no choice, my time had come, I had to leave. But not without having to
>>>>> convince many others first.
>>>>>
>>>>Reminds me of a hippie I used to work with.....He was always extolling
>>>>the
>>>>mesa top in Arizona where he used to live.....A colony of hippies that
>>>>"removed themselves from society" and "made it on their own" away from
>>>>all
>>>>the trials and tribulations of the modern world. I asked him what they
>>>>did
>>>>when one of their members got sick, or tripped and broke something. "Oh,
>>>>we
>>>>had doctors there" he said.....Doctors who were trained in huge
>>>>stainless
>>>>steel hospitals, I asked. He fell silent.....And where did you buy your
>>>>drugs? - Oh, we went into town to the drugstore.....Drugs that were made
>>>>in
>>>>huge stainless steel factories? - Well, you get the idea....They were
>>>>not
>>>>really independent of modern society at all.......
>>>
>>> Too bad for them. We learned all the herbal cures of the culture of the
>>> island we were on. There's a reason the emergency medical supplies were
>>> in
>>> The Library. Nobody ever had need of them. The few that did use them
>>> were
>>> newcomers that hadn't learned better ways yet. Did you know, for
>>> example,
>>> that a simple Ti plant leaf can be used two ways to dress a wound? The
>>> dull
>>> side is astringent and will help to close up a clean wound. The shiny
>>> side
>>> has an anti-coagulative property and would allow a wound to drain and
>>> flush
>>> out any infection. Both sides having an antibiotic property.
>>>
>>> Did you know that during WWII when they ran out of penicillin that they
>>> reverted back to an old "folk remedy" of using the spice Thyme to fight
>>> infections? They found it worked better than penicillin. But since no
>>> doctor or hospital can pay their light bills or the CEOs line their
>>> pockets
>>> with sales of Thyme from the grocery story it's never prescribed.
>>>
>>> Enjoy your "stainless steel factories" that the majority, and most at
>>> risk
>>> of illness and disease, can no longer afford. The medical system of
>>> modern
>>> society has an impending collapse of its own on the way. The incurable
>>> world pandemic will start in whatever communities are the most
>>> financially
>>> poor. You have ensured your own demise with greed. Do read "The Masque
>>> of
>>> the Red Death" by Edgar Alan Poe. All the money in the world will not be
>>> able to save you.
>>>
>>I won't hold my breath....there's a lot more to modern medicine than Thyme
>>and penicillin.....The next time I break a leg, I think I'll check into a
>>"stainless steel" hospital, thanks......
>
> I broke an arm about 10 years ago. They screwed up the first operation and
> didn't set the bone right. To fix their errors they scheduled a second
> operation. One that took FIVE HOURS on the operating table (I still have
> all the medical records of this fiasco if anyone wants proof). In the five
> hours it took them to set a simple and clean bone fracture they could have
> done a heart-lung transplant. But no, they needed and wanted all that
> insurance money instead. Still they didn't get the second operation
> correct. When I refused to pay for the second operation, that was needed
> to
> fix their first malpractice in the first place, they tried to sue me for
> my
> home and land. I would have been better off splinting it by myself in the
> very first place and never entering the doors of any hospital.
>
> Are you even aware that more people die from non-illness related medical
> errors in hospitals than they do from car accidents? You have a better
> chance of driving recklessly and surviving than any time you walk through
> the doors of any hospital. This is a verified FACT.
>
> Yes, you do that. Go to those "stainless steel" hospitals that can't even
> set a simple bone fracture today without you possibly losing your home and
> all you have ever worked for in your life.
>
> Do you mind if I laugh some more at your stupidity and naivety?
>

I won't mind.....When you give me a reasonable alternative. but living on a
mountaintop in Arizona and trying to set my fractures with some wild herb or
other isn't what I call, "reasonable".

I certainly wouldn't voluntarily enter a hospital unless I had no other
choice, but in those few times when I have had to so such a thing, there
really wasn't any other choice.....What will you do the next time you break
a bone?

Perhaps I am a bit luckier than you.....I have had some pretty good doctors
in my life. I haven't generally needed them myself, but my wives and
children and other friends have, and while their experiences haven't always
been perfect, they have, in general been pretty good.

From: Bill Graham on

"Pete Stavrakoglou" <ntotrr(a)optonline.net> wrote in message
news:ht5srf$217$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
> "Bill Graham" <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
>> fact, having that third who weren't interested leave was one of the best
>> things about the class. The rest of us were really interested in learning
>> the subject. Everyone got 90% for a class grade at the end, but of
>> course, NYC had the regence exam, and that was our real grade. (at least
>> for Eastern universities) We all did quite well in the regence exam......
>
> Regents testing is still administered.
>
I thought the NYC regence system was an excellent idea.....It insured some
statewide uniformity in the teaching process. Every student of a particular
subject in the whole state got to take the exact same test at the exact same
time. Although I am unaware of exactly who evaluated the test results, and
where this took place, the tests I saw and took were in general, excellent.
It's too bad that at that time (the 50's) they weren't accepted in all other
parts of the country.....I had to repeat some of my classes when I applied
for entrance into the University of California back in 1952.......

From: Bill Graham on

"Stuffed Crust" <pizza(a)spam.shaftnet.org> wrote in message
news:4bf6890b$0$12392$9a6e19ea(a)unlimited.newshosting.com...
> In rec.photo.digital.slr-systems Bill Graham <weg9(a)comcast.net> wrote:
>> geometry without any help from the teacher whatsoever! As a matter of
>> fact,
>> having that third who weren't interested leave was one of the best things
>> about the class. The rest of us were really interested
>
> And that, I think, is the key point. GEtting rid of those who don't
> want to be there (and/or are unwilling to do the necessary work) does
> wonders. But then that goes against one of the core tenants of
> mandatory schooling...
>
> No Child Left Behind also means that No Child Gets Ahea..
>
> - Solomon

Exactly.....(you got one of the main points of my post)

From: Albert Ross on
On Wed, 19 May 2010 11:52:26 -0400, "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com>
wrote:

>I notice that Catholic schools seem to be doing a lot better job, and with a
>lot less money. And no unions.

Except sexual ones