From: Peter on
"Albert Ross" <spam(a)devnull.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:gq6mt5p0pndutsm0i0thkp5u344vgt63f0(a)4ax.com...
> On Wed, 28 Apr 2010 23:43:35 +0900, "David J. Littleboy"
> <davidjl(a)gol.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Japanese and Germans, with a superior record of economic prosperity and
>>family life, appoint engineers and designers to their company boards.
>>Britain's major companies appoint accountants who are pre-occupied with
>>controlling and cutting costs rather than maximising investment,
>>production
>>and value added."
>
> BTDT. Our accountants in the UK will spend pounds in order to save
> pennies

This is not limited to UK acountants. There are accountants and good
accountancs, who understand the practical business aspects of their
recommendations. There is the classic story of the cost acountant in a
supermarket who dictated that every product had to bring in $498.56 per/sq
ft, per day. One product did not, so they stopped selling candy at the
checkout counter.


--
Peter

From: tony cooper on
On Fri, 30 Apr 2010 08:07:58 -0400, "Peter"
<peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net> wrote:

>"Walter Banks" <walter(a)bytecraft.com> wrote in message
>news:4BDA5E18.E6114D2F(a)bytecraft.com...
>>
>>
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>> A bad rule. I had a very good dentist. When she couldn't accept the
>>> partial
>>> payment my poor insurance provided, I had to drop her, even though I
>>> would
>>> have been happy to make up the difference out of my own pocket....but the
>>> state laws made that impossible....She was not allowed to bill me the
>>> difference. So today, I have a different, (and not as good) dentist. As
>>> usual, my government screws me. - So what else is new?
>>
>> Use another approach. Use the American approach buy different
>> insurance that would pay for the coverage you desire or buy no
>> insurance and just pay for the dentist you would prefer.
>>
>
>
>For dental procedures that works fine. Most dentistry is not covered under
>Medicare. What Bill doesn't mention is that he can use the same dentist
>without resort to the policy and all will be well. Most dental insurance is
>a crock, anyway.

Bill seems to find many ways to do the anatomically impossible. If he
likes his dentist, he can be treated by that dentist as uninsured. It
would cost him a few bucks, but - instead - he takes the government
money and goes to a dentist that isn't as good.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
From: Bill Graham on

"Peter" <peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net> wrote in message
news:4bdb2c3d$0$15023$8f2e0ebb(a)news.shared-secrets.com...
> "Walter Banks" <walter(a)bytecraft.com> wrote in message
> news:4BDA5E18.E6114D2F(a)bytecraft.com...
>>
>>
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>> A bad rule. I had a very good dentist. When she couldn't accept the
>>> partial
>>> payment my poor insurance provided, I had to drop her, even though I
>>> would
>>> have been happy to make up the difference out of my own pocket....but
>>> the
>>> state laws made that impossible....She was not allowed to bill me the
>>> difference. So today, I have a different, (and not as good) dentist. As
>>> usual, my government screws me. - So what else is new?
>>
>> Use another approach. Use the American approach buy different
>> insurance that would pay for the coverage you desire or buy no
>> insurance and just pay for the dentist you would prefer.
>>
>
>
> For dental procedures that works fine. Most dentistry is not covered
> under Medicare. What Bill doesn't mention is that he can use the same
> dentist without resort to the policy and all will be well. Most dental
> insurance is a crock, anyway.
>
> --
> Peter
I agree that "most dental insurance is a crock...." But I pay for my policy
automatically....It is a rider on the health plan provided to me by my
Stanford Health Insurance that I paid for for the 29 years I worked for
Stanford.(and still pay for) ...there is no way I can separate it from the
other policy, so I would be paying double if I went to some other plan, or
paid for my dental work separately.There are things seriously wrong with
dental insurance. I had a low grade bone cancer in my mouth about 3 years
ago. They had to remove some bone, including three upper teeth in order to
get rid of it. the poor dental insurance I had wouldn't pay for it, so I had
to pay for the operation out of pocket. I asked the dentist when would my
other insurance kick in and take over the payments....He said "only if it
was a life and death matter". So, even though I have excellent health
insurance, I ended up paying for this operation out of my own pocket. There
is no reason why dental work should be kept separate from other health
problems......You can die from problems that start in the jaw, so why
doesn't normal health insurance cover those problems?

From: Albert Ross on
On Fri, 30 Apr 2010 15:24:58 -0400, "Peter"
<peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net> wrote:

>"Albert Ross" <spam(a)devnull.com.invalid> wrote in message
>news:gq6mt5p0pndutsm0i0thkp5u344vgt63f0(a)4ax.com...
>> On Wed, 28 Apr 2010 23:43:35 +0900, "David J. Littleboy"
>> <davidjl(a)gol.com> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Japanese and Germans, with a superior record of economic prosperity and
>>>family life, appoint engineers and designers to their company boards.
>>>Britain's major companies appoint accountants who are pre-occupied with
>>>controlling and cutting costs rather than maximising investment,
>>>production
>>>and value added."
>>
>> BTDT. Our accountants in the UK will spend pounds in order to save
>> pennies
>
>This is not limited to UK acountants. There are accountants and good
>accountancs, who understand the practical business aspects of their
>recommendations. There is the classic story of the cost acountant in a
>supermarket who dictated that every product had to bring in $498.56 per/sq
>ft, per day. One product did not, so they stopped selling candy at the
>checkout counter.

Hahahaha yes that's the thing
From: Albert Ross on
On Fri, 30 Apr 2010 08:07:58 -0400, "Peter"
<peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net> wrote:

>"Walter Banks" <walter(a)bytecraft.com> wrote in message
>news:4BDA5E18.E6114D2F(a)bytecraft.com...
>>
>>
>> Bill Graham wrote:
>>
>>> A bad rule. I had a very good dentist. When she couldn't accept the
>>> partial
>>> payment my poor insurance provided, I had to drop her, even though I
>>> would
>>> have been happy to make up the difference out of my own pocket....but the
>>> state laws made that impossible....She was not allowed to bill me the
>>> difference. So today, I have a different, (and not as good) dentist. As
>>> usual, my government screws me. - So what else is new?
>>
>> Use another approach. Use the American approach buy different
>> insurance that would pay for the coverage you desire or buy no
>> insurance and just pay for the dentist you would prefer.
>>
>
>
>For dental procedures that works fine. Most dentistry is not covered under
>Medicare. What Bill doesn't mention is that he can use the same dentist
>without resort to the policy and all will be well. Most dental insurance is
>a crock, anyway.

Again similar in the UK. NHS dental treatment has been more or less
reduced to amalgam fillings and extractions, and you still have to pay
a portion of the charges.

Private dentists can carry out a far wider range of treatments and
though "modern" fillings may be more expensive up front they are
likely to last a lot longer so are cost effective long term.

My old dentist was brilliant. Initially he got a LOT of extra business
by continuing with NHS work when others had abandoned it, and took on
an extra partner to cope with the workload, but when they made it even
more cost-ineffective he gave it up, mainly because he was not happy
to work down to the imposed standards.

He convinced me to take out insurance but it actually turned out a lot
cheaper to pay for the treatments myself.