From: J. Clarke on
On 5/7/2010 12:09 PM, Peter wrote:
> "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
> news:2010050708481825228-savageduck1(a)REMOVESPAMmecom...
>> On 2010-05-07 08:18:58 -0700, "Peter" <peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net>
>> said:
>
>>> A power hammer would have the same effect. Indeed, something similar
>>> is used in slaughter houses.
>>
>> Aah! The "No Country for Old Men" system.
>>
>> Anyway the "...or any instrument which a reasonable person would
>> believe to be capable of being used as a weapon as defined in Penal
>> Code 12020;" should cover any hammer, baseball bat, golf club, hockey
>> stick, ski pole, etc. Given what an inmate learns with regard to
>> fabricating weapons while in prison, a pencil could fall into that
>> category.
>
>
> Wonder if a statute written so broadly is really enforceable. It seems
> to me that your ordinance would prohibit parolees from working in the
> construction industry. In NYC enacted an ordinance that as so broadly
> written the women in Central Park would have been prohibited from
> knitting. The ordinance was quickly determined to be Unconstitutional.
> My Leatherman has a blade longer than 2".

A reasonable person can break a window and use a shard of glass as a
weapon if he needs one badly enough. So such a statute would outlaw
windows. That same reasonable person could imagine strangling someone
with shoestrings, so bye bye shoestrings. Then there were the two
murders in Chicago some years back where underwear was the weapon. So
no more underwear. By extension any kind of clothing would have to be
outlawed . . .
>

From: tony cooper on
On Fri, 7 May 2010 11:25:31 -0400, "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com>
wrote:

>
>"Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
>news:201005070700181393-savageduck1(a)REMOVESPAMmecom...
>> On 2010-05-07 04:56:34 -0700, tony cooper <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net>
>> said:
>>
>> So that leaves us with about 60-62K who should successfully complete
>> parole each year. Part of the final documentation from the parole agent
>> could be a certificate restoring voting rights.
>
>Those are very interesting numbers.
>
>I have what I believe is the perfect solution to U.S. prison overpopulation,
>which I modestly call the Harrington Plan. Here it is, free, gratis and at
>no charge:
>
>Our states arrange with some other country, preferably in South America or
>perhaps Asia, to take our convicted felons. The benefits would be enormous
>to all concerned (except the felons involved, of course). I understand that
>each inmate of an American prison costs the taxpayer more than $20,000 a
>year, perhaps much more than that in some cases. I'll bet a country like,
>say, Ecuador would jump at the chance to take them for $1,000 a year. This
>would help their economy a great deal while saving the American taxpayers
>millions. It would also probably stop gang leaders from continuing to run
>their criminal operations while in prison. And the thought of doing time in
>an Ecuadoran prison (or Indonesian, or whatever) might even serve as a
>useful deterrent to crime.
>
>Great, huh? (I really think a little applause would be appropriate at this
>point.)
>

Fidel Castro beat you to this solution. In 1980 he sent about 125,000
Cuban prisoners to Florida. They included many violent criminals.



--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
From: tony cooper on
On Fri, 07 May 2010 18:28:52 +0100, Albert Ross
<spam(a)devnull.com.invalid> wrote:

>On Wed, 05 May 2010 21:48:46 -0400, tony cooper
><tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote:
>
>>That is not because Democrats tend to be criminals. It's because the
>>Republican criminals have better lawyers or are lawyers.
>
>Hahahahahaha
>
>Amazing that the State which gave the world Jeb Bush and hanging chads
>should be so hard on "criminals" eh?

I'm not sure what you meant by that, but Jeb Bush is the one
Republican and member of the Bush family that I have respect for.
There are a few things that Jeb did that I disagreed with, but for the
most part he was one of our better Governors.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
From: Neil Harrington on

"Will T" <nospam(a)noaddress.org> wrote in message
news:ajp8u5l4vqg38c7soe5fjfnghjur82e9kr(a)4ax.com...
> On Fri, 7 May 2010 14:23:11 -0400, "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Peter wrote:
>>> "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> wrote in message
>>> news:ffOdnf0qgpHBtHnWnZ2dnUVZ_rSdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>>
>>>> "Peter" <peternew(a)nospamoptonline.net> wrote in message
>>>> news:4be32172$0$27753$8f2e0ebb(a)news.shared-secrets.com...
>>>>> "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:0PidnfYBjd7ycX_WnZ2dnUVZ_gKdnZ2d(a)giganews.com...
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "David Ruether" <d_ruether(a)thotmail.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:hrudm3$638$1(a)ruby.cit.cornell.edu...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Unless they are suddenly afflicted by a severe attack of Humpty
>>>>>> Dumptyism (or a couple more Obama radical-lib appointees, which
>>>>>> effectively amounts to the same thing), they will not.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Exactly which "radical-lib" was appointed by our President?
>>>>
>>>> Obviously, Sotomayor.
>>>>
>>>>> Which decision[s] made prior to appointment, of his one appointee
>>>>> do you object to?
>>>>
>>>> Most famously, her ruling against white firefighters in New Haven, on
>>>> purely racist grounds. She was then and undoubtedly still is in
>>>> favor of discriminating against white males. That ruling of hers was
>>>> of course overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court. Now she's part of
>>>> that court, which is bad news for anyone who cares about justice.
>>>>
>>>> The "wise Latina woman" remains what she always has been, in favor of
>>>> preferential treatment for certain races and genders, such as her
>>>> own. She has as much as said she wants to use the court for her own
>>>> political agenda, rather than to support the Constitution as it
>>>> stands. She made a joke of it on at least one occasion.
>>>
>>>
>>> That's what I thought you were talking about. Her original decision,
>>> which was fortunately overturned, was based upon precedents that
>>> existed at the time of her decision.
>>
>>What precedents?
>>
>>> That decision doesn't make her a
>>> racist. We will have to wait and see her subsequent decisions.
>>
>>I think she's already made it clear what she is. Of course she downplayed
>>her agenda during confirmation, as anyone with that sort of agenda would.
>>
>>> At the risk of starting a flame war, I agree with the the decision
>>> that , race or ethnicity should never be a factor in hiring. Having
>>> said that, my comment only applies if the hiring tests are not
>>> skewed. e.g. if an "intelligence" test included a ;question on the
>>> meaning of "pants on the ground" it would be skewed.
>>
>>I believe the claims that certain population groups consistently score
>>lower
>>on intelligence tests because the tests are "skewed" has been pretty well
>>debunked.
>>
>
> Wow. What century are you living in.

The Anything-Can-Happen Century.

Look at this, a man in Germany just "married" his cat:

http://blogtown.portlandmercury.com/BlogtownPDX/archives/2010/05/03/i-now-pronounce-you-man-and-cat

Now there you go. Can television sets be far behind?


From: Neil Harrington on

"tony cooper" <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:f739u5dbuguccanu3eg9qbvtondueflfte(a)4ax.com...
> On Fri, 7 May 2010 11:25:31 -0400, "Neil Harrington" <never(a)home.com>
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
>>news:201005070700181393-savageduck1(a)REMOVESPAMmecom...
>>> On 2010-05-07 04:56:34 -0700, tony cooper <tony_cooper213(a)earthlink.net>
>>> said:
>>>
>>> So that leaves us with about 60-62K who should successfully complete
>>> parole each year. Part of the final documentation from the parole agent
>>> could be a certificate restoring voting rights.
>>
>>Those are very interesting numbers.
>>
>>I have what I believe is the perfect solution to U.S. prison
>>overpopulation,
>>which I modestly call the Harrington Plan. Here it is, free, gratis and at
>>no charge:
>>
>>Our states arrange with some other country, preferably in South America or
>>perhaps Asia, to take our convicted felons. The benefits would be enormous
>>to all concerned (except the felons involved, of course). I understand
>>that
>>each inmate of an American prison costs the taxpayer more than $20,000 a
>>year, perhaps much more than that in some cases. I'll bet a country like,
>>say, Ecuador would jump at the chance to take them for $1,000 a year. This
>>would help their economy a great deal while saving the American taxpayers
>>millions. It would also probably stop gang leaders from continuing to run
>>their criminal operations while in prison. And the thought of doing time
>>in
>>an Ecuadoran prison (or Indonesian, or whatever) might even serve as a
>>useful deterrent to crime.
>>
>>Great, huh? (I really think a little applause would be appropriate at this
>>point.)
>>
>
> Fidel Castro beat you to this solution. In 1980 he sent about 125,000
> Cuban prisoners to Florida. They included many violent criminals.

I remember that -- the Marielita crowd, wasn't it? Very nasty types, not
made any more well-mannered by having done time in Cuban prisons.

But that was not by formal arrangement. He just put them on boats and told
'em "America's that way," or something close to that. My plan is to do it by
agreement.