From: Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) on
tomm42 wrote:
> On Mar 7, 7:03 am, "ipy2006" <ipyasa...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>> I have to shoot action photos in low light conditions. What is the
>> best DSLR for this purpose?
>> Thanks,
>> Yip
>
>
> I'd look at a Canon 30D, about the best for a reason able price, the
> Canon 5D is better but 3X (approx) the price. Canons seem to have a
> heavier in camera noise reduction than the cameras with a Sony sensor.

Not quite. Canon sensors have inherently low noise at low signal
levels. Noise reduction implies some method of reducing noise,
and that can only be done by averaging pixels to reduce
spatial resolution. One can do that in software in post processing.
It helps to have a good low noise/high signal system to begin with.

See:
Digital Cameras: Does Pixel Size Matter?
Factors in Choosing a Digital Camera
http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/does.pixel.size.matter

Digital Camera Sensor Performance Summary
http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/digital.sensor.performance.summary

For the OP: choose a camera with the largest pixels and the lowest
read noise. The two relevant plots on the digital.sensor.performance.summary
web page are Figure 3 (lower on the plot is better), Figure 6 (higher
on the plot is better) and Figure 7 (higher = better).

> Remember you won't get by with a kit lens here. If you are in school
> gyms, swimming pools etc you will neeed at least an f2.8 lens. A
> 70-200 f2.8 pushes $2K. If you buy single focal length lenses 85 -
> 135mm should cover what you need, just look at lenses that are f1.4-
> f2.8, price escalate dramaticly after 135mm. Some claim they get by
> with a fast 50mm, doesn't seem long enough for me. An 85 f1.8 or a 135
> f2 should be good lenses to look at, depending on the distance of the
> action. Just calculate what f-stop and ISO can get you to a shutter
> speed of at least 1/250 of a second.
> Vibration reduction will be of minimal usefulness you should be at
> shutter speeds that don't need it and the blur will come from the
> action.

For indoor action shots, a 50mm f/1.8 lens is very low cost (about %70)
and very high performance. Remember, on a 1.6x crop camera,
50 mm is like 80 mm on a full frame camera regarding full field
of view.

Roger
From: Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) on
ipy2006 wrote:

> Here are some scenarios,
> Indoor shooting of people talking with hand gestures, people walking
> or pacing in the room, kids playing, women cooking in kitchen, or
> groups of people in meeting rooms etc. Sometimes I don't have the
> ability to use lights, I need to depend on flash and high brightness
> setting. Currently, I am using a Sony Digital Camera, Cyber-shot, DSC-
> H2. My budget is $1000 and at the most $1500.

What, you don't take pictures of men cooking in the kitchen?

>
> I read some review that Canon Eos Digital Rebel xTi DSLR is good low
> lighting. Nikon D80 was good but the article said more as a available-
> light camera.
>
> Please comment.

The rebel xti (400D) has smaller pixels than other rebel cameras,
5.7 microns) (and smaller than many other DSLRs). I don't have
data on the xti, but can see on Figure 6 at
http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/digital.sensor.performance.summary
that plotting at 5.7 microns in the gray band, the
performance would probably be below most other DSLRs on the plot.
(If you can't see the gray band on the plot, your monitor
is set too bright/too high contrast.)

Roger
From: Skip on

"ipy2006" <ipyasaswi(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1173268980.676512.227070(a)h3g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>I have to shoot action photos in low light conditions. What is the
> best DSLR for this purpose?
> Thanks,
> Yip
>
Probably the best DSLR for your purpose would be the upcoming Canon 1D
mkIII, it shoots 10 fps, has a "silent mode," an ISO range up to3200
expandable to 6400. That being said, a appropriate lens is critical to the
equation. Depending on what the subject is, a 70-200 f2.8 zoom or a fixed
focal length lens like the 100 f2, 85 f1.8 or 85 f1.2 could be excellent
choices. Notice, when you say "best," without saying what you're budget is,
the best is expensive, the body will probably be in the $4000+ range, the
70-200 f2.8 is about $1600, and the 85 f1.2 is about $1200.

--
Skip Middleton
www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
www.pbase.com/skipm


From: DeanB on
On Mar 7, 9:04 am, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
<usern...(a)qwest.net> wrote:
> tomm42 wrote:
> > On Mar 7, 7:03 am, "ipy2006" <ipyasa...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> >> I have to shoot action photos in low light conditions. What is the
> >> best DSLR for this purpose?
> >> Thanks,
> >> Yip
>
> > I'd look at a Canon 30D, about the best for a reason able price, the
> > Canon 5D is better but 3X (approx) the price. Canons seem to have a
> > heavier in camera noise reduction than the cameras with a Sony sensor.
>
> Not quite. Canon sensors have inherently low noise at low signal
> levels. Noise reduction implies some method of reducing noise,
> and that can only be done by averaging pixels to reduce
> spatial resolution. One can do that in software in post processing.
> It helps to have a good low noise/high signal system to begin with.
>
> See:
> Digital Cameras: Does Pixel Size Matter?
> Factors in Choosing a Digital Camera
> http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/does.pixel.size.matter
>
> Digital Camera Sensor Performance Summary
> http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/digital.sensor.performance.sum...
>
> For the OP: choose a camera with the largest pixels and the lowest
> read noise. The two relevant plots on the digital.sensor.performance.summary
> web page are Figure 3 (lower on the plot is better), Figure 6 (higher
> on the plot is better) and Figure 7 (higher = better).
>
> > Remember you won't get by with a kit lens here. If you are in school
> > gyms, swimming pools etc you will neeed at least an f2.8 lens. A
> > 70-200 f2.8 pushes $2K. If you buy single focal length lenses 85 -
> > 135mm should cover what you need, just look at lenses that are f1.4-
> > f2.8, price escalate dramaticly after 135mm. Some claim they get by
> > with a fast 50mm, doesn't seem long enough for me. An 85 f1.8 or a 135
> > f2 should be good lenses to look at, depending on the distance of the
> > action. Just calculate what f-stop and ISO can get you to a shutter
> > speed of at least 1/250 of a second.
> > Vibration reduction will be of minimal usefulness you should be at
> > shutter speeds that don't need it and the blur will come from the
> > action.
>
> For indoor action shots, a 50mm f/1.8 lens is very low cost (about %70)
> and very high performance. Remember, on a 1.6x crop camera,
> 50 mm is like 80 mm on a full frame camera regarding full field
> of view.
>
> Roger

This (1.2) would be a lens to save up for in your situation:

http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcategoryid=152&modelid=12926

But the 1.4's are about $900 to $1000.

From: ipy2006 on
On Mar 7, 9:23 am, "DeanB" <deanbrow...(a)yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Mar 7, 9:04 am, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
>
>
>
>
>
> <usern...(a)qwest.net> wrote:
> > tomm42 wrote:
> > > On Mar 7, 7:03 am, "ipy2006" <ipyasa...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > >> I have to shoot action photos in low light conditions. What is the
> > >> best DSLR for this purpose?
> > >> Thanks,
> > >> Yip
>
> > > I'd look at a Canon 30D, about the best for a reason able price, the
> > > Canon 5D is better but 3X (approx) the price. Canons seem to have a
> > > heavier in camera noise reduction than the cameras with a Sony sensor.
>
> > Not quite. Canon sensors have inherently low noise at low signal
> > levels. Noise reduction implies some method of reducing noise,
> > and that can only be done by averaging pixels to reduce
> > spatial resolution. One can do that in software in post processing.
> > It helps to have a good low noise/high signal system to begin with.
>
> > See:
> > Digital Cameras: Does Pixel Size Matter?
> > Factors in Choosing a Digital Camera
> > http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/does.pixel.size.matter
>
> > Digital Camera Sensor Performance Summary
> > http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/digital.sensor.performance.sum...
>
> > For the OP: choose a camera with the largest pixels and the lowest
> > read noise. The two relevant plots on the digital.sensor.performance.summary
> > web page are Figure 3 (lower on the plot is better), Figure 6 (higher
> > on the plot is better) and Figure 7 (higher = better).
>
> > > Remember you won't get by with a kit lens here. If you are in school
> > > gyms, swimming pools etc you will neeed at least an f2.8 lens. A
> > > 70-200 f2.8 pushes $2K. If you buy single focal length lenses 85 -
> > > 135mm should cover what you need, just look at lenses that are f1.4-
> > > f2.8, price escalate dramaticly after 135mm. Some claim they get by
> > > with a fast 50mm, doesn't seem long enough for me. An 85 f1.8 or a 135
> > > f2 should be good lenses to look at, depending on the distance of the
> > > action. Just calculate what f-stop and ISO can get you to a shutter
> > > speed of at least 1/250 of a second.
> > > Vibration reduction will be of minimal usefulness you should be at
> > > shutter speeds that don't need it and the blur will come from the
> > > action.
>
> > For indoor action shots, a 50mm f/1.8 lens is very low cost (about %70)
> > and very high performance. Remember, on a 1.6x crop camera,
> > 50 mm is like 80 mm on a full frame camera regarding full field
> > of view.
>
> > Roger
>
> This (1.2) would be a lens to save up for in your situation:
>
> http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelDetailAct&fcate...
>
> But the 1.4's are about $900 to $1000.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thank you all for your feedback.
Yip