From: Keith Tapscott. on

Richard Knoppow;744145 Wrote:
>
> One patent covering the Microdol type developer is:
> USP 2466423 issued to John I. Crabtree and Richard Henn and
> assigned to Kodak. The patent has some discussion of the
> problem of silver fog in fine grain developers and suggests
> some compounds for suppressing it. There are sample formulas
> for both liquid concentrate and powdered developers. The
> simplest is copied below but I suggest reading the patent
> for a greater understanding of what the inventors were
> trying to do.
>
> Microdol _type_ developer
>
> Water to make 1 liter
> Metol 5.0 grams
> Sodium sulfite, anhydrous 100.0 grams
> Ethylene diamine sulfate 12.0 grams
> Sodium metaborate 4.0 grams
> Potassium bromide 0.25 grams
> Sodium chloride 20.0 grams
>
> The patent is dated 1945 so its about right for the
> original Microdol. The X version was released a couple of
> years later. Presumably the X indicates an improvment,
> probably in the form of a better silver sequestering agent.
> Kodak holds many patents on various sequestering agents,
> only a couple are mentioned in the above patent.
>
>
> --
> ---
> Richard Knoppow
> Los Angeles, CA, USA
> dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com There are some other similar patents for fine-grain developers
including that one.
http://www.google.com/patents




--
Keith Tapscott.
From: Richard Knoppow on

"Keith Tapscott." <Keith.Tapscott..2d1a009(a)photobanter.com>
wrote in message
news:Keith.Tapscott..2d1a009(a)photobanter.com...
>
> Richard Knoppow;744145 Wrote:
>>
>> One patent covering the Microdol type developer is:
>> USP 2466423 issued to John I. Crabtree and Richard Henn
>> and
>> assigned to Kodak. The patent has some discussion of the
>> problem of silver fog in fine grain developers and
>> suggests
>> some compounds for suppressing it. There are sample
>> formulas
>> for both liquid concentrate and powdered developers. The
>> simplest is copied below but I suggest reading the patent
>> for a greater understanding of what the inventors were
>> trying to do.
>>
>> Microdol _type_ developer
>>
>> Water to make 1 liter
>> Metol 5.0 grams
>> Sodium sulfite, anhydrous 100.0 grams
>> Ethylene diamine sulfate 12.0 grams
>> Sodium metaborate 4.0 grams
>> Potassium bromide 0.25 grams
>> Sodium chloride 20.0 grams
>>
>> The patent is dated 1945 so its about right for the
>> original Microdol. The X version was released a couple of
>> years later. Presumably the X indicates an improvment,
>> probably in the form of a better silver sequestering
>> agent.
>> Kodak holds many patents on various sequestering agents,
>> only a couple are mentioned in the above patent.
>>
>>
>> --
>> ---
>> Richard Knoppow
>> Los Angeles, CA, USA
>> dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com There are some other similar
>> patents for fine-grain developers
> including that one.
> http://www.google.com/patents
>
>
>
>
> --
> Keith Tapscott.

Thats where I found it, probably doing a name search for
Richard Henn. Google Patents is an excellent research tool
since you can do complete text searches on any U.S. patent
ever issued and all are available directly as PDFs. The U.S.
Patent Office site allows text searches only for patents
issued from 1976 and all patents are downloaded as
page-by-pate FAX Tiff files. Its easy enough to convert them
to a single PDF but Google does it for you. Each patent will
give you some clue as to other searches. Its never ending
and a very great time sink.


--
---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com


From: Geoffrey S. Mendelson on
Richard Knoppow wrote:
> Thats where I found it, probably doing a name search for
> Richard Henn. Google Patents is an excellent research tool
> since you can do complete text searches on any U.S. patent
> ever issued and all are available directly as PDFs.


Before Google Patents and the USPTO web site, IBM had an on-line
patent search web site. If you read the fine print, they told you that
they data-mined the queries. They had a group of people reading the
results of the data mining and the best ideas were presented to IBM
managment for evaulation and possible development as IBM products.

Since Google data-mines everything they "give" you, I would be very
careful about what I search there. I'm not saying they will take your
ideas, but who knows. It may also be construed as publication in a
court of law.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com N3OWJ/4X1GM
From: Richard Knoppow on

"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" <gsm(a)mendelson.com> wrote in message
news:slrng8o0tr.8b8.gsm(a)cable.mendelson.com...
> Richard Knoppow wrote:
>> Thats where I found it, probably doing a name search
>> for
>> Richard Henn. Google Patents is an excellent research
>> tool
>> since you can do complete text searches on any U.S.
>> patent
>> ever issued and all are available directly as PDFs.
>
>
> Before Google Patents and the USPTO web site, IBM had an
> on-line
> patent search web site. If you read the fine print, they
> told you that
> they data-mined the queries. They had a group of people
> reading the
> results of the data mining and the best ideas were
> presented to IBM
> managment for evaulation and possible development as IBM
> products.
>
> Since Google data-mines everything they "give" you, I
> would be very
> careful about what I search there. I'm not saying they
> will take your
> ideas, but who knows. It may also be construed as
> publication in a
> court of law.
>
> Geoff.
>
> --
> Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel gsm(a)mendelson.com
> N3OWJ/4X1GM

Well, first of all I am searching to satisfy my
curiousity. Secondly, most of the patents I look at are very
old, long expired, and not useful for anyone trying to guess
what new, novel, and useful things I am inventing. I doubt
if anyone doing serious patent searches for the purpose of,
say, finding out if something is prior art, would use Google
and one can not use the USPTO site for that except for a
fee: the free searching has a limit.


--
---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk(a)ix.netcom.com
WB6KBL



From: Nicholas O. Lindan on
> They had a group of people reading the
> results of the data mining and the best ideas were presented to IBM
> managment for evaulation and possible development as IBM products.

That doesn't happen. IBM is full of people promoting
their _own_ ideas, no one there is about to promote
someone else's.

Inspiration is worthless, it's the
perspiration that is worth something.

--
Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
Darkroom Automation: F-Stop Timers, Enlarging Meters
http://www.darkroomautomation.com/index2.htm
n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot com