From: UC on
On Aug 22, 9:22 am, Christian Sulzer <christian.sul...(a)inode.at>
wrote:
> Hi!
>
> I'm practicing darkroom work for about 5 months now as a hobby using
> Tri-X and X-Tol(1:1) as my film/dev combo, printing my 35mm Neg's on
> Multigrade RC-Paper from 18x24 to 24x30 (cm), so my experience is pretty
> moderate.
> When I look at pictures from my favourite Photographers like Larry
> Towell, Koudelka, Burri etc. i always wondered how to achieve this
> grainy, sharp look even at lower enlargement sizes.
> I tried pushing Tri-X to 1600 but it did not force grain size too much,
> and it is not always an option for photographing subjects. Since i want
> to stick with Tri-X as long as possible, i thought about trying another
> developer (HC-110/Rodinal?). I use a Meopta Magnifax 4A enlarger with
> Meograde. Maybe someone could give me a hint?
>
> Thanks in advance and sorry for my poor english,
> Chris

Try this:

Expose your film at half the ISO speed and develop for about 2/3 the
recommended time. Print on grade 3 filtration (adjust the developing
time until all your negatives print well on grade 3). You prints will
look VERY sharp and the grain will be well-defined but 'fine'.

From: pico on
Christian Sulzer wrote:
> Hi!
>
> I'm practicing darkroom work for about 5 months now as a hobby using
> Tri-X and X-Tol(1:1) as my film/dev combo, printing my 35mm Neg's on
> Multigrade RC-Paper from 18x24 to 24x30 (cm), so my experience is pretty
> moderate.

Grain is your friend. Believe it.

First make the image sharp using good technique, then try D-76, ID-11
(about the same) and Rodinal 1:100. The later will give more latitude,
or 1:25 for super-snap.

Repeat: GRAIN IS YOUR FRIEND! The digital mavens can't so the same
thing. They get noise in the black space and think it's grain. Pity.

From: UC on
On Aug 22, 8:21 pm, pico <p...(a)pico.pico> wrote:
> Christian Sulzer wrote:
> > Hi!
>
> > I'm practicing darkroom work for about 5 months now as a hobby using
> > Tri-X and X-Tol(1:1) as my film/dev combo, printing my 35mm Neg's on
> > Multigrade RC-Paper from 18x24 to 24x30 (cm), so my experience is pretty
> > moderate.
>
> Grain is your friend. Believe it.
>
> First make the image sharp using good technique, then try D-76, ID-11
> (about the same) and Rodinal 1:100. The later will give more latitude,
> or 1:25 for super-snap.
>
> Repeat: GRAIN IS YOUR FRIEND! The digital mavens can't so the same
> thing. They get noise in the black space and think it's grain. Pity.


Sharp, small, well-defined grain, yes. Big, blobby 'push' grain is
ugly.

From: 1990lt5 on
A sturdy tripod is the first step toward maximum sharpness regardless
of shutter speed, format or camera type. Second step: cable release.
Third step: mirror lock (if you have one). There are many valid
excuses for not using a tripod but nothing will contribute more to a
sharp detailed negative than a well made tripod. If you want to pursue
this subject further consider reading Barry Thornton's Edge of
Darkness. As to grain I have always looked to minimize it so can't
help there but cropping at the enlargement stage is a sure way to
increase grain size.

From: otzi on
<1990lt5(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
news:1187940291.681271.240570(a)i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
>A sturdy tripod is the first step toward maximum sharpness regardless
> of shutter speed, format or camera type. Second step: cable release.
> Third step: mirror lock (if you have one). There are many valid
> excuses for not using a tripod but nothing will contribute more to a
> sharp detailed negative than a well made tripod. If you want to pursue
> this subject further consider reading Barry Thornton's Edge of
> Darkness. As to grain I have always looked to minimize it so can't
> help there but cropping at the enlargement stage is a sure way to
> increase grain size.
>

To push this even further a compendium lens hood/shield goes a long way to
making an image look clearer. Sharper?. Not so much the little play metal
rings so often available but I am refering to the bellows hoods that remove
/reduce as much oblique light falling on to the lens (ecpecially on dull
overcast days.) and if one uses a reducer on the front that is racked in and
out to just fit the image showen on the gg. will help deduce any stray
internal scattered light thats not actually image forming. My $0.02 worth.
--
Otzi